Register for Thursday’s WormLab Webinar

Learn how to use WormLab, our new software for tracking and analyzing the movement of C. elegans by taking our free webinar, Thursday, May 10, at 12pm EDT. Staff Scientist Dr. Susan Hendricks and Vice President of Research and Development Jeffrey Sprenger will lead an hour-long practical demonstration that will include:

• the detection, tracking, and analysis of single or multiple worms, even during interaction events;

•  viewing the many metrics and behaviors that are automatically calculated, including worm count, speed, direction, reversals, and omega bends;

•  capturing videos of worms on agar plates; and automatically loading and analyzing these videos.

Released last month, WormLab is a user-friendly new tool that facilitates the analysis of C. elegans locomotive behavior. Our Introduction to WormLab webinar will provide an excellent overview to the software, while providing current and prospective users an opportunity to ask any questions they may have.

Please register in advance for the free webinar, and visit the WormLab page on our website for more information about the software and to watch a video demonstration.

 

Magnified: C. Elegans Captured with Lumenera CMOS Camera

MBF Bioscience Vice President of Research Jeff Sprenger captured this exceptional image of c.elegans worms while testing out the Lumenera CCD Lu135M digital camera. He was working with our new WormLab software, which is set for release next week. Here Jeff shares the details about how he captured the image:

This image was captured on our experimental WormLab setup, using a macro-imaging stand and setup devised here at MBF Bioscience. The c. elegans worms are trapped in a drop of liquid on an agar plate (60mm petri dish). We’re testing a Lumenera CCD Lu135M digital camera, using an exposure time of 120 ms and gain of 2.0X with no gamma adjustment for this image. The lens is a Canon Macro zoom MPE-65mm, with c-mount adapter. The light source is an MBF Bioscience LED light plate, with a custom diaphragm and polarizing filter to increase contrast. 

WormLab, software for tracking crawling microscopic worms, is set for official release next week. C. elegans (caenorhabditis elegans) are commonly used by geneticists and neuroscientist to study life span, regulation of metabolism, behavior and development.

Learn more about WormLab on our website.

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Upcoming MBF Bioscience Software WormLab Facilitates C. elegans Research

It’s tiny, it’s translucent, and it’s one of the simplest organisms with a nervous system. Measuring in at just one millimeter long, the roundworm C. elegans is a researcher’s superstar.

Used by scientists around the world to study degenerative diseases, the worm played a leading role in an opera in the Netherlands and inspired a British engineer’s search and rescue robot. Just last month, a wealth of new opportunities opened up when scientists redesigned the worm’s genetic code by adding a synthetic amino acid.

With C. elegans becoming so beneficial to biological research, we’re pleased to be working on WormLab™, a fully supported software solution for tracking, quantifying, and analyzing freely moving C. elegans, which will be available this fall.

“A number of researchers familiar with the quality of our software for neuron tracing and stereology came to us looking for a solution for analyzing C. elegans behavior,” said MBF Bioscience President Jack Glaser. “The more we looked into this field, the more apparent it became that there was a need for good software.”

Its genome has been sequenced, its cells have been mapped. And with the release of WormLab™ this fall, new software for tracking its behavior will significantly improve the productivity of scientists using C. elegans in their research.

Learn more about specific capabilities of WormLab™ on our website www.mbfbioscience.com/wormlab where you’ll also find a link to our video demonstrations.