Researchers cited MBF Bioscience systems in 11 papers between 3/9/2018 and 3/16/2018

Stereo Investigator:
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Deroche-Gamonet, V., Revest, J.-M., Fiancette, J.-F., Balado, E., Koehl, M., Grosjean, N., . . . Piazza, P.-V. (2018). Depleting adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis increases cocaine-seeking behavior. Molecular Psychiatry. doi: 10.1038/s41380-018-0038-0.

Mendez-Gomez, H. R., Singh, J., Meyers, C., Chen, W., Gorbatyuk, O. S., & Muzyczka, N. (2018). The Lipase Activity of Phospholipase D2 is Responsible for Nigral Neurodegeneration in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease. Neuroscience. doi:

Wang, Y., Wang, Y., Liu, J., & Wang, X. (2018). Electroacupuncture Alleviates Motor Symptoms and Up-Regulates Vesicular Glutamatergic Transporter 1 Expression in the Subthalamic Nucleus in a Unilateral 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Hemi-Parkinsonian Rat Model.  Neuroscience bulletin. doi: 10.1007/s12264-018-0213-y.


Borreca, A., Latina, V., Corsetti, V., Middei, S., Piccinin, S., Della Valle, F., . . . Amadoro, G. (2018). AD-Related N-Terminal Truncated Tau Is Sufficient to Recapitulate In Vivo the Early Perturbations of Human Neuropathology: Implications for Immunotherapy. Molecular Neurobiology. doi: 10.1007/s12035-018-0974-3.

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Researchers cited MBF Bioscience systems in 28 papers between 3/2/2018 and 3/9/2018

Stereo Investigator:
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Akca, G., Eren, H., Tumkaya, L., Mercantepe, T., Horsanali, M. O., Deveci, E., . . . Yilmaz, A. (2018). The protective effect of astaxanthin against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy, 100, 575-582. doi:

Aytan, N., Choi, J.-K., Carreras, I., Crabtree, L., Nguyen, B., Lehar, M., . . . Dedeoglu, A. Protective effects of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone on neuropathological and neurochemical changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. European Journal of Pharmacology. doi:

Chu, X., Zhou, S., Sun, R., Wang, L., Xing, C., Liang, R., & Kong, Q. (2018). Chrysophanol Relieves Cognition Deficits and Neuronal Loss Through Inhibition of Inflammation in Diabetic Mice. Neurochemical Research. doi: 10.1007/s11064-018-2503-1.

Domínguez-Álvaro, M., Montero-Crespo, M., Blazquez-Llorca, L., Insausti, R., DeFelipe, J., & Alonso-Nanclares, L. (2018). Three-dimensional analysis of synapses in the transentorhinal cortex of Alzheimer’s disease patients. Acta Neuropathologica Communications, 6(1), 20. doi: 10.1186/s40478-018-0520-6.

El Massri, N., Weinrich, T. W., Kam, J. H., Jeffery, G., & Mitrofanis, J. (2018). Photobiomodulation reduces gliosis in the basal ganglia of aged mice. Neurobiology of Aging. doi:

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American Association of Anatomists Launches Virtual Microscopy Database powered by Biolucida

Free resource for educators and researchers features thousands of downloadable histology slides

Educators and researchers around the world now have free access to a database of whole slide images (also known as virtual slides) for histology and pathology. Featuring thousands of virtual slides contributed by 15 universities, The Virtual Microscopy Database, VMD, ( is an online resource that allows educators to view and download virtual images and share their own.

Powered by MBF Bioscience‘s Biolucida® for Medical Education solution, VMD gives educators an overview of individual slides and allows examination of various parts of the image at magnifications up to 40x. The users can take a screenshot or download the file at any time.

Funded by an Innovations Program Grant awarded by the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), the resource was developed by researchers from the University of Colorado, Drexel University College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan with corporate support from MBF Bioscience. With thousands of freely accessible virtual microscopy images, the VMD helps meet a growing need for better access to histology slides among educators and non-profit research organizations. The AAA foresees the images being used in a variety of educational ways such as for lectures, exams, and for creating supplementary course material as well as for non-profit research initiatives.

Collection of Virtual Slides in the Biolucida Viewer

“The greatest strength of the VMD is the availability of a large number of high quality virtual microscopy images to its users. The diversity and multiple examples of histological variations available in the VMD collections will enable histology and pathology educators to elevate the quality of their teaching by exposing their students to a broader variety of images and by experimenting with new pedagogical techniques in their classrooms.” (Lisa Lee, Ph.D., University of Colorado)

“We are proud to be part of the AAA’s efforts to improve the access of histology and pathology digital slides for medical educators and students by providing the underlying technology for this important resource. Any of the virtual slides in this new resource can be downloaded and used on an organization’s Biolucida on-premise or cloud-based server,” says Jack Glaser, president of MBF Bioscience.

Individuals affiliated with educational or research institutions may register to access the database. Once approved, users can browse files, or search for specific types of tissue. Currently, the VMD site includes over 2,600 virtual microscopy files, but as new users join the VMD file sharing community that number will grow as will the diversity of tissue and species type.

About AAA:

The American Association of Anatomists was founded by Joseph Leidy in Washington, D.C. in 1888 for the “advancement of anatomical science.” Today, via research, education, and professional development activities, AAA serves as the professional home for an international community of biomedical researchers and educators focusing on the structural foundation of health and disease.

About MBF Bioscience:

MBF Bioscience produces advanced microscopy imaging and analysis systems for biomedical research and education. The award-winning company was co-founded in 1988 by Edmund and Jack Glaser.


Nathan O’Connor, Ph.D.

Product Manager/Technical Sales


Researchers cited MBF Bioscience systems in 15 papers between 12/8/2017 and 12/15/2017

Stereo Investigator:
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Garcia-Miralles, M., Geva, M., Tan, J. Y., Yusof, N. A. B. M., Cha, Y., Kusko, R., . . . Pouladi, M. A. (2017). Early pridopidine treatment improves behavioral and transcriptional deficits in YAC128 Huntington disease mice. JCI Insight, 2(23). doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.95665.

Gomez-Smith, M., Janik, R., Lake, E. M., Thomason, L. A. M., Adams, C., Jeffers, M. S., . . . Corbett, D. (2017). Reduced Cerebrovascular Reactivity and Increased Resting Cerebral Perfusion in Rats Exposed to a Cafeteria Diet. Neuroscience. doi:

Hawkins, R. F. W., Patenaude, A., Dumas, A., Jain, R., Tesfagiorgis, Y., Kerfoot, S., . . . Vallières, L. (2017). ICAM1+ neutrophils promote chronic inflammation via ASPRV1 in B cell–dependent autoimmune encephalomyelitis. JCI Insight, 2(23). doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.96882.

Joseph, M., Anglada-Huguet, M., Paesler, K., Mandelkow, E., & Mandelkow, E.-M. (2017). Anti-aggregant tau mutant promotes neurogenesis. Molecular Neurodegeneration, 12(1), 88. doi: 10.1186/s13024-017-0230-8.

Kelm-Nelson, C. A., Brauer, A. F. L., Barth, K. J., Lake, J. M., Sinnen, M. L. K., Stehula, F. J., . . . Ciucci, M. R. (2018). Characterization of early-onset motor deficits in the Pink1−/− mouse model of Parkinson disease. Brain Research, 1680, 1-12. doi:

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NeuroMorpho.Org Releases Nearly 10,000 New Neuron Reconstructions and Neurolucida leads the way

Image Courtesy: Bob Jacobs, Ph.D. , Colorado College

With the release of its new version on November 28, adds 9,987 new images to its archive, bringing its impressive collection of digitally reconstructed neurons to 80,012.

Scientists used MBF Bioscience’s software, Neurolucida and Neurolucida 360, to reconstruct the majority of these cells. In fact, 64 times more neurons were reconstructed with MBF Bioscience software than those imaged by our closest commercial competitor – that’s 42,121 reconstructions compared to 656. This metric demonstrates that Neurolucida and Neurolucida 360 are truly the gold standards for neuron reconstruction.

Featuring contributions from hundreds of laboratories from around the globe, NeuroMorpho.Org is the world’s leading database of publicly accessible 3D neuronal reconstructions and associated metadata. From the dragonfly to the humpback whale, researchers have access to accurate and verified data from an array of different organisms. Arranged by animal species, brain region, cell type, or contributing laboratory, each file contains specific details about the cell’s morphology such as age, developmental stage, soma volume, and number of branches – all of which are searchable.

Recently, NeuroMorpho.Org hit the 8 million download mark, with researchers in 166 different countries accessing this valuable resource, and more than one thousand published articles referencing its data

MBF Bioscience unveils whole mouse brain automatic region delineation and cell mapping with the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas

An experimental coronal mouse brain section automatically aligned to the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas

Analyzing cellular populations within specific anatomies in brain images requires expertise in both neuroanatomy and cellular identification. This typically involves a scientist comparing experimental images with a reference atlas and manually delineating anatomical regions and marking cell populations within. NeuroInfo®, a revolutionary new technology from MBF Bioscience, enables researchers to automatically identify and delineate mouse brain regions based on the publicly available Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas.

“NeuroInfo has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of how mental disorders influence neuronal cell populations,” says Nathan O’Connor Ph.D., product manager at MBF Bioscience. “Because it makes identifying brain regions substantially faster and more accurate, researchers will be able to explore many more brain regions.”

“The Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas is a valuable tool to assist scientists in their research. We’re thrilled that MBF has chosen to integrate this resource into NeuroInfo,” stated Amy Bernard, Ph.D., Product Architect at the Allen Institute for Brain Science.

“Using this remarkable technology, neuroscientists will obtain more repeatable, objective analyses that have been possible to date. Thanks to the integration with the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Atlas, these analyses will be more standardized so that they can be compared across experiments and laboratories,” says Jack Glaser, President.

NeuroInfo can be used with MBF Bioscience’s slide scanning software and virtually all commercial whole slide scanners. The data from NeuroInfo seamlessly integrates with MBF Bioscience’s products including Neurolucida, Stereo Investigator, Biolucida, and BrainMaker.

The tools in NeuroInfo allow researchers to automatically delineate anatomies in the experimental specimens, and detect cells within these anatomies. NeuroInfo yields data that can be invaluable to better understand the organization and composition of the nervous system, and to further knowledge in neurogenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and connectomics.

The National Institute of Mental Health provides funding to support the development of NeuroInfo.

Visit us at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, DC

The SfN 2017 meeting is the culmination of an exciting year of new technological achievements at MBF Bioscience. Our new version 2017 of Neurolucida, Stereo Investigator, and Neurolucida 360 features a totally re-designed interface and has been an overwhelming success with our customers. We’ve also expanded the stereology family with Stereo Investigator Cleared Tissue edition and Stereo Investigator Whole Slide Imaging edition. And we have received wide enthusiasm for our new optogenetics stand for WormLab, our worm tracking software.

Come see our innovative new system that includes a high-speed, 4-channel laser confocal scanner for fast confocal whole slide imaging in both 2D and 3D. It is creating a new paradigm for big data image acquisition and analysis. You simply will not believe the slide scanning speed we will be demonstrating for confocal imaging.

Curious about new technologies for microvasculature analysis? Come and discover Vesselucida.

Tired of using a printed brain atlas and wish there was an easier way to identify the brain anatomy on your sections? Imagine technology that can automatically identify the anatomical region on your sections by just clicking on it! Come see our new automatic brain mapping technology that matches serial sections of mouse brain to the Allen Brain Atlas.

Visit us at booth #1637 to see the latest advancements in quantitative neuroscience research and learn how our “End-To-End” solutions for Image Acquisition – Image Management – Image Analyses will revolutionize the way you make your next discovery.

If you’ve visited our booth at SfN before, you know how busy we can be.  If you’d like to schedule an appointment to reserve the time to meet with us that works best for you, just use this online form.  Or just stop by to see us for a personalized demonstration of any of our software or imaging systems.

We are looking forward to seeing you there!

Diet Restriction Slows Neurodegeneration and Extends Lifespan of DNA-Repair-Deficient Mice

DNA damage occurs in human cells at a constant rate. These cells are usually able to repair themselves, but sometimes deficiencies in certain genes cause the repair process to shut down. When damaged DNA isn’t fixed, mutations can occur that cause accelerated aging or cancerous tumors to form (Hoeijmakers, 2009). Scientists at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam have found a way to slow down the process – at least in mice.

In a study published in Nature, the researchers report that when mice deficient in the DNA-repair genes Ercc1 or Xpg are put on a restricted diet, they experience better overall health and increased lifespans compared to DNA-repair-deficient mice fed a normal diet. They also found significantly lower levels of neurodegeneration in the brains and spinal cords of diet restricted animals compared to controls.

“Here we report that a dietary restriction of 30 percent tripled the median and maximal remaining lifespans of these progeroid mice, strongly retarding numerous aspects of accelerated aging Mice undergoing dietary restriction retained 50 percent more neurons and maintained full motor function far beyond the lifespan of mice fed ad libitum,” (Vermeij, et al 2016).

Since the DNA-repair-deficient mice were already smaller and weaker than normal mice, the Rotterdam researchers wondered whether diet restriction would be beneficial or detrimental to their health. They found that gradually restricting the diets of DNA-repair-deficient mice starting at age seven weeks increased their median lifespans from 10 to 35 weeks in males and 13 to 39 weeks in females as compared to controls.

They also saw significant differences in the levels of neurodegeneration between these two populations. Using Stereo Investigator, they found 50 percent more neurons in the brains of diet-restricted mice compared to those fed a normal diet. They also saw lower levels of cells expressing p53 – a protein expressed in response to DNA damage – in diet-restricted mice.

According to the authors, dietary restriction may not fix defects in DNA repair mechanisms, but it may help to reduce the severity and speed at which the damage occurs.

“Our findings establish the Ercc1 mouse as a powerful model organism for health-sustaining interventions, reveal potential for reducing endogenous DNA damage, facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of dietary restriction and suggest a role for counterintuitive dietary-restriction-like therapy for human progeroid genome instability syndromes and possibly neurodegeneration in general,” (Vermeij, et al 2016).

Vermeij W.P., Dollé M.E.T., Reiling E., Jaarsma D., Payan-Gomez C, Bombardieri C.R., Wu H., Roks A.J.M., Botter S.M., van der Eerden B.C., Youssef S.A., Kuiper R.V., Nagarajah B., van Oostrom C.T., Brandt R.M.C., Barnhoorn S., Imholz S., Pennings J.L.A., de Bruin A., Gyenis Á., Pothof J, Vijg J, van Steeg H., and Hoeijmakers J.H.J. (2016) Restricted diet delays accelerated aging and genomic stress in DNA repair deficient mice. Nature 537, 427-431, doi:10.1038/nature19329

Hoeijmakers JH (2009) DNA Damage, aging, and cancer. N Engl J Med; 361:1475-1485, DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra0804615

Stock image of DNA used in accordance with the CC0 public domain license.

Researchers cited MBF Bioscience systems in 30 papers between 09/01/2017 and 09/22/2017

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Bebber, M. R. (2017). Tempered strength: A controlled experiment assessing opportunity costs of adding temper to clay. Journal of Archaeological Science, 86, 1-13. doi:

de Ávila, C., Chometton, S., Lenglos, C., Calvez, J., Gundlach, A. L., & Timofeeva, E. (2017). Differential effects of relaxin-3 and a selective relaxin-3 receptor agonist on food and water intake and hypothalamic neuronal activity in rats. Behavioural Brain Research. doi:

El-Feky, G. S., El-Banna, S. T., El-Bahy, G. S., Abdelrazek, E. M., & Kamal, M. (2017). Alginate coated chitosan nanogel for the controlled topical delivery of Silver sulfadiazine. Carbohydrate Polymers. doi:

Chikama, K., Yamada, H., Tsukamoto, T., Kajitani, K., Nakabeppu, Y., & Uchimura, N. (2017). Chronic atypical antipsychotics, but not haloperidol, increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult mouse. Brain Research, 1676(Supplement C), 77-82. doi:

Ghuman, H., Gerwig, M., Nicholls, F. J., Liu, J. R., Donnelly, J., Badylak, S. F., & Modo, M. (2017). Long-term retention of ECM hydrogel after implantation into a sub-acute stroke cavity reduces lesion volume. Acta Biomaterialia. doi:

Hawlitschka, A., Holzmann, C., Witt, S., Spiewok, J., Neumann, A.-M., Schmitt, O., . . . Antipova, V. (2017). Intrastriatally injected botulinum neurotoxin-A differently effects cholinergic and dopaminergic fibers in C57BL/6 mice. Brain Research, 1676(Supplement C), 46-56. doi:

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Researchers cited MBF Bioscience systems in 27 papers between 08/18/2017 and 09/01/2017

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Balu, D. T., Presti, K. T., Huang, C. C. Y., Muszynski, K., Radzishevsky, I., Wolosker, H., . . . Coyle, J. T. (2017). Serine Racemase and D-serine in the Amygdala are Dynamically Involved in Fear Learning. Biological Psychiatry. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2017.08.012.

Boulanger, J. J., & Messier, C. (2017). Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are paired with GABA neurons in the mouse dorsal cortex: Unbiased stereological analysis. Neuroscience. doi:

Farrand, A. Q., Helke, K. L., Gregory, R. A., Gooz, M., Hinson, V. K., & Boger, H. A. (2017). Vagus nerve stimulation improves locomotion and neuronal populations in a model of Parkinson’s disease. Brain Stimulation. doi:

Figueiredo, T. H., Harbert, C. L., Pidoplichko, V., Almeida-Suhett, C. P., Pan, H., Rossetti, K., . . . Marini, A. M. (2017). Alpha-Linolenic Acid Treatment Reduces the Contusion and Prevents the Development of Anxiety-Like Behavior Induced by a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.  Molecular Neurobiology. doi: 10.1007/s12035-017-0732-y.

Guan, J., Yang, B., Fan, Y., & Zhang, J. (2017). GPER Agonist G1 Attenuates Neuroinflammation and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Parkinson Disease. Neuroimmunomodulation, 0(0), 60-66.

Loris, Z. B., Hynton, J. R., Pieper, A. A., & Dietrich, W. D. (2017). Beneficial Effects of Delayed P7C3-A20 Treatment After Transient MCAO in Rats. Translational Stroke Research. doi: 10.1007/s12975-017-0565-z.

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