Scientists Use Neurolucida to Create 3D Reconstructions of Placental Villous Trees

(a,b) Comparison of the microscopic aspects of a thin (4–6 μm) histological section of a human placenta after staining with hematoxylin/eosin (a) with the microscopic aspects of a whole-mount isolated villous tree after staining with hematoxylin (b). The scale bars in a and b are 250 μm. (a) Various cross- and longitudinal sections of villi can be recognized. The stromal architecture inside the sectioned villi is visible. The cross-sections of branches belong to an unknown number of villous trees. (b) A single villous tree is visible, and branches are not sectioned. The hierarchical positions of nodes (branching points) and the branching topology can be recognized.

(a,b) Comparison of the microscopic aspects of a thin (4–6 μm) histological section of a human placenta after staining with hematoxylin/eosin.

When neuroscientists started studying neurons in 3D, it revolutionized brain science. Now, for the first time, scientists are using this same technology to study the human placenta, and they’ve made some fascinating new discoveries about its structure.

Using Neurolucida to create 3D reconstructions of villous trees – three-dimensional structures in the placenta that facilitate gas and nutrient exchange between the fetus and mother – researchers in Munich, Germany uncovered a wealth of information about their architecture.

For the first time, they analyzed the complexity of villous tree branches and branching, determined the number and location of nodes (branching points), and measured branch angles, discovering a surprising correlation between the branching angle of terminal branchesand the fetoplacental weight ratio (BW/PW) – a calculation commonly used to measure fetal health in prenatal medicine.

“The results show that 3D analysis with Neurolucida reaches beyond the horizons of 2D histology, the current gold standard in placenta morphology/pathology,” said Dr. Hans-Georg Frank, an author of the study. Continue reading “Scientists Use Neurolucida to Create 3D Reconstructions of Placental Villous Trees” »

Munich Scientists Analyze Placenta Morphometry with Stereo Investigator

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The placenta delivers nutrients from a mother’s blood to a developing fetus. It also produces hormones that help the baby grow during its forty or so weeks in utero. But the placenta’s powerhouse abilities don’t end there. The organ provides a wealth of information about the infant’s future health, allowing doctors to make predictions about whether or not the child will develop autism or, later in life, heart disease.

A recent study conducted at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany offers new insights into the relationship between the placenta and postnatal health.

Continue reading “Munich Scientists Analyze Placenta Morphometry with Stereo Investigator” »