How Transplanted Stem Cells Behave in Injured Spinal Cord Tissue

A representative confocal image of spinal cord tissue fluorescently immunolabeled for SC121 in conjunction with GFAP – markers that allowed the researchers to track stem cell differentiation and migration by stereological quantification. (Image provided by study author Dr. Aileen J. Anderson)

A representative confocal image of spinal cord tissue fluorescently immunolabeled for SC121 (red) in conjunction with GFAP (green) – markers that allowed researchers to quantify stem cell differentiation and migration. (Image provided by study author Dr. Aileen J. Anderson)

Research has shown that transplanting human neural stem cells into damaged spinal cords restores locomotor function in a mouse model of spinal cord injury1. Researchers who worked on that study have published another paper examining how these neural stem cells behave in injured tissue as they aid in healing. Learning how stem cells behave in injured tissue will hopefully help researchers develop better treatments for spinal cord injuries.

In the study, researchers used Stereo Investigator to stereologically quantify the survival, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of human neural stem cells transplanted into injured and uninjured mice. Stem cells were analyzed in mouse brain tissue specimens 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days after transplantation. The research found that there were fewer stem cells in the injured animals compared to the uninjured animals at all time points, stem cells in injured mice localized near the center of the injury, a delay of stem cell proliferation in injured tissue led to an overall deficit of actively dividing cells, proliferation in injured mice occurred closer to the injection sites (the locations where the stem cells were injected into the mice), and the injured microenvironment increased differentiation to more mature oligodendrocytes.

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