Exercise Heals the Brain After Binge Drinking

The granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus captured using a 100x objective. Image provided by Mark Maynard.

The granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Image provided by Mark Maynard.

Binge drinking damages brain regions responsible for memory, decision-making, and behavioral control. After a binge, the brain begins to heal itself but not much is known about this self-repair process. In a study published in PLoS ONE, researchers used rats to find that binge drinking damages the hippocampus, and exercise reverses this damage.

The study found that excessive ethanol killed granule neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampus, and significantly decreased the volume of the DG. Rats that exercised after binging had more DG granule neurons and a larger DG than rats that did not exercise after a binge. In fact, rats that exercised after binging had a similar number of DG neurons and a similar DG volume to that of controls, indicating that exercise almost fully reversed damaged to the DG caused by binge drinking.

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